Fine Historic Agent's House for sale in Geashill on Laois Offaly border

Fine Historic Agent's House for sale in Geashill on Laois Offaly border

Matt Dunne Auctioneer brings to the market one of the finest properties in the Midlands.

This residence, known as ‘The Agents House’, was built in 1860 by Lord Digby. It holds a prominent position within the picturesque village of Geashill. A detached 3 bay 2 storey house with central projecting gable fronted bay and extension to rear.

Attractive yellow brick walls with Flemish bond and reddish mortar, indicative of its era. The rendered chimney stacks and tooled coin stones are also beautiful features. Oculus to the front with its tooled stone surround, and now refitted with its original clock. The segmental headed door and ornate window surrounds are an additional feature to a perfectly proportioned building. Acc: 4 spacious bedrooms, 2 bath, utility, kitchen/dining and reception. The 10ft side-entrance leads to a large private walled garden to the rear, complete with original cut-stone sheds. A unique property in one of Ireland’s most picturesque villages. 8 ½ miles Tullamore, 8 ½ miles Portarlington train station. Matt Dunne & Associates will be holding open viewings on Saturday, August 26th, and September 2nd & 9th September between 14:00 – 16:00. Please confirm attendance by contacting the office 057-8623349 or info@mattdunne.ie. Private viewings by appointment can also be arranged.

Medieval Geashill - An Anglo Norman settlement was built here in 1185 by the First Baron of Offaly, Gerald Fitzmaurice Fitzgerald. Only the West wall of the original castle remains. In 1598 Lettice Fitzgerald married Robert Digby from Warwickshire, who was brother of the First Earl of Bristol and whose son was created first Baron Digby of Geashill in 1620. The estate contained 34,000 acres.

19th Century Geashill - Edward St Vincent Digby came into the estate in 1856 and it was under his management that William Stuart Trench was appointed ‘Agent’ from 1857 – 1871. Under his guidance the barony of Geashill experienced a ‘golden age’ of prosperity.

Vast improvements were made to the architecture of the village including the construction of The Agents House in 1860.

Furthermore the landscape gained national and international recognition for Lord Digby as well as earning Trench the legacy of an improver well ahead of his time. However not all members of the community shared in the prosperity, Mr Trench was also described as ‘an Agent ruthless in his management who broke leases, levelled people’s homes and banished the poor.’