Must grope before you tickle, says judge in fish groping case

The case was dismissed and the defendants were allowed two guineas costs by Justice Sweetman at Portarlington District Court on Tuesday, when an adjourned fishing case was heard.

The case was dismissed and the defendants were allowed two guineas costs by Justice Sweetman at Portarlington District Court on Tuesday, when an adjourned fishing case was heard.

At the previous court, the justice had adjourned the case against Dermot Higgins, Patrick Street, and Matthew Geoghegan, St Brigid’s Square, Portarlington, to decide on the word “grope”.

The two men had been charged with groping for fish.

At Tuesday’s court, Justice Sweetman said he was not satisfied with “groping”. When a person groped they did so first and then tickled the fish. From a dictionary, he continued, it was “a fish must be groped for first and then tickled as well”.

Mr Healy, solicitor, succeeded in getting the costs for the defendants.

Turnover tax

As a direct result of the Turnover Tax, a law will be introduced to ensure that traders will show price lists of all goods for sale. All goods named in the schedule of the act will come under the proposed regulations.

This, it is confidently hoped, will put an end to all allegations that in certain areas traders have taken advantage of the act to increase prices. Wherever it is found that prices have been unduly increased, appropriate action may be taken by the minister.

Now that the Turnover Tax is law, the public are earnestly requested to give their fullest cooperation to ensure that exploitation will not take place.