DCSIMG

More merry tales and political musing in the new Windsor

March 4, 1939.

If breeziness be really the characteristic of the not always merry month of March, the early spring number of ‘The Windsor’ is certainly in keeping.

Its stories and articles, drawings and humorous features are all alive and vital, as fresh as the daffodils, as invigorating as the wind that frolics round the corner. One of the best of the stories is Weston Martyr’s ‘The Better Man’, a really funny yachting yarn of the little-known mud flats of the lower Thames estuary.

There are first class love stories, such as ‘The Surgeon who lost his heart in Monte Carlo,’ by Claude Lillington, and ‘Sergt. Blake and the Spider,’ by Showell Styles.

South Africans and all those who are interested in that great dominion have learnt to look for the stories of Alfred Kowie, of which ‘Scotchman’ in this issue is certainly one of the best and perhaps the funniest.

Among the more serious features chief place must be given to Sir Charles Petrie’s interesting speculations as to ‘Possible Prime Ministers of the Future’, with especial reference to the younger generation who must inevitably ere long take the place of the current cabinet, owing to the dearth in all parties of men of ability between the ages of 40 and 55 which follows from the loss of the generation which lies in its graves in Flanders and elsewhere.

No one should miss this article or the many other excellent features to be found in this number of ‘The Windsor’.

 
 
 

Back to the top of the page