DCSIMG

Small hats for ladies in the cinema, and hats off to de Valera

March 18, 1939.

I notice more and more women are wearing small hats on the occasion of their visits to the cinemas, and my men friends tell me that they can at least sit in comfort at the pictures behind women without performing weird neck-line gyrations to see the screen, or, alternatively, leaning forward and asking: “Would you very much mind, madam, removing your hat?”

The latter type, by the way, are, I think, very much in the minority, for few men have the courage to ask for hats to be taken off. Still, I don’t see why they should not. After all, men take off their hats in cinemas so the least we can do is to wear little toques or else do the same as the men.

I see in Paris they have evolved a special hat “pour le cinema”. It is close fitting and made of a shiny leather, so that should cigarette ash fall on it it can easily be flicked off and does not require brushing, as would be the case were the material velvet or some other soft silky material.

* * *

The condensed reports published of Mr de Valera’s speech on Partition in Seanad Eireann have led to serious misunderstanding of what he said, both in the North and in the South of Ireland.

It deals with every aspect of the Partition question, shows how the sentiments of the minority are provided for in the Irish Constitution, and how the businessman, the worker and the farmer in the North-East would gain by recognition of all Ireland as one economic unit. Of particular importance are his references to British Government responsibility for maintaining Partition, the desire of the great majority of the Irish people for the unity of their country, and the right to decide whether to be involved in war.

 
 
 

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