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Stories and features fit for royalty in the latest Windsor

January 28, 1939.

The latest number of the popular magazine The Windsor contains a quite exceptional selection of first-class stories by well-known authors, as well as more serious features of remarkable variety and interest.

James Gorman Ball has another of his famous Doctor Dogbody yarns, in which the redoubtable old naval surgeon accounts for his wooden leg in yet another way, and incidentally gives a remarkable picture of the formidable personage, Catherine the Great of Russia. It was apparently a pleasure to sacrifice a leg in Her Majesty’s service, but she does not appear to have been particularly appreciative.

In ‘Wealth Without Wages’, Lady Tegart, the work of whose husband, Sir Charles Tegart, in Palestine is so well known, tells the story of the Jewish Agricultural Colonies, an experiment some of the features of which are being adopted in distressed areas in Great Britain.

Of even greater interest to many will be the study of Dr Douglas Hyde, the first Irish President, by Rupert Strong, which gives a picture of a very charming gentleman undertaking late in life duties of considerable delicacy and responsibility that he could never have anticipated.

Other notable features are Ronald F. Tiltman’s hints on ‘Flying in Five Minutes’, and Gray Temple’s amusing and learned derivation of the names of inns. There is also some remarkably good verse and an ‘Editor’s Scrapbook’ as full as ever of jokes and funny drawings.

 
 
 

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