DCSIMG

Volunteers vow not to be the runts of the litter in new Ireland

June 13, 1914.

A mass meeting of Nationalists and Irish Volunteers of the County Kildare was held at the Gibbet Rath, adjoining the Curragh Camp, on Sunday, for the purpose of organising the National Volunteers for County Kildare.

About 600 Volunteers marched from Kildare, and a similar number from Newbridge, which also included the Athy Company. Contingents of Nationalists from other districts were present.

Mr John O’Grady, JP, Kildare, who was moved to the chair, said they were met in a historic spot, where their forefathers died for freedom in 1798. The same blood flowed in their veins as in those of their rebel ancestors, and they were animated with the same spirit. They had met to establish a new branch of the Irish Volunteers, whose object would be support Mr John Redmond and the Irish Party, and to show their enemies that never again could they take away the people’s rights (cheers).

The Home Rule Bill had passed the Commons, but they were not yet out of the wood. Their opponents were powerful and wealthy, but the Irish people would show by their opposition, their discipline, and their courage that they were not afraid to face Carson and his army (cheers).

In 1798 the army was against them, and it was against them still; but Ireland would show them she did not care two straws whether the army was against her or not, for never again would they submit to be placed on an inequality in their own land.

There would be no more top dogs, as there had been. The organisation they were forming that day would be under the control of men of the county, and would never be used for any purpose except to support the Irish Parliamentary Party (cheers).

 
 
 

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