Labour Senator attacks Sinn Féin



SF’s ‘Fantasy Republic’

Sinn Fein’s confused stance on wealth tax proposals this week highlights a party that is heavy on rhetoric and light on specifics. But this is nothing new.

In a messy episode, its Finance spokesperson, Pearse Doherty, conceded to the Irish Times on Tuesday that it is going to be impossible to accurately estimate how much their wealth tax plans would generate for the exchequer.

As a result, he seemed to suggest that it won’t make it into their pre-Budget submission this year for the first time since 2010.

The real truth is that no amount of back-pedalling or spin-doctoring can disguise the fact that Sinn Féin’s budget costings and calculations are, yet again, unreliable and threadbare, and should be immediately costed by the Department of Finance, which they failed to do for last year’s Budget.

After all, this the very same party who, in last year’s Budget submission, claim to have consistently set out fair measures “to make a deficit adjustment that adds up”. How can they claim something adds up if they don’t know what savings certain measures will reap in the first place?

This is of course the Party who want us to play ‘Fantasy Republic’ with them, where you can demand everything, have everything, protest about everything and pay for nothing!

Sinn Fein has begun to choke on its own brass neck, and its constant attempts at trying to re-write history are sickening to all decent people. With budget season now clearly underway, your readers will be inundated with a myriad of analysis, debate and speculation from commentators predicting what will or won’t make it into Budget 2014.

Sinn Fein at least owe it to the public - your readers - to make sure that unlike last year, they avail of the Department of Finance facility to have the full package properly costed and that their proposals are subject to rigid scrutiny by experts.

Enough fairytale economics. The stakes are too high. People deserve to be presented with real alternatives, not theatrics and populist reactionary guff.

Senator John Whelan