Financial help for cancer patients

Laois Hospice has launched a new scheme which will provide financial assistance for cancer patients who could face medical bills running to thousands of euro.

Laois Hospice has launched a new scheme which will provide financial assistance for cancer patients who could face medical bills running to thousands of euro.

Fittingly, Laois Hospice, which was the first homecare service to be set up outside of Dublin when it was founded 25 years ago, is again to the forefront of providing innovative and vital support services.

Chairman of Laois Hospice, Seamus O’ Donoghue urged people diagnosed with cancer to contact him if they are in financial hardship due to their illness. He said the matter would be dealt with discreetly in conjunction with palliative care and the Citizens Advice service.

On Sunday, Laois Hospice celebrated a quarter of a century in existence in the magnificent grounds of Emo Court.

The event was held to recognise all the volunteers who work with Laois Hospice, as well as the people from all over the county who generously donate every year. Mr O’Donoghue acknowledged the generous support they receive from the county and beyond and said they could not operate without this support.

Several speakers from past committees outlined how the local hospice committee was founded and continued for the next 25 years.

An ecumenical blessing on the day was performed by Dr Patrick Nulty, Bishop of Kildare and Leighlin, Archdeacon John Murray, Rev. Olive Donohue and Conor Harper S.J. Refreshments were served in the magnificent setting with the group also taking in a walk around the lake, guided by Laois Vintage and the walkers in Clonaslee who generously donate to the Hospice.

Mr O’Donoghue noted that Laois Hospice has contributed to hospitals in Mountmellick, Abbeyleix, Portlaoise and Shaen, as well as the homecare service. Laois Hospice has committed to providing funding of €250,000 for care in the community to fund palliative nursing care and also provide specialised equipment, “to make the end of a patient’s life as easy and as dignified as possible”, Mr O’Donoghue said.

Those present at the Emo Court event have been “an integral part of Laois Hospice and have contributed greatly to it,” Mr O’Donghue said.