Ancient axe discovered by Laois Archaeology in River Barrow

Leinster Express Reporter

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Leinster Express Reporter

Ancient axe discovered by Laois Archaeology in River Barrow

Axhead discovered in the River Barrow. Picture: Laois Archaeology

An axe representing 6,000 years of settlement in Laois has been discovered in the River Barrow.

Laois Archaeology has announced a recent discovery which was found as a result of a Waterways Ireland funded project on the heritage of the Grand Canal.

The group say what appears to be a polished Neolithic black chert axehead was uncovered during dredging work on the River Barrow near Vicarstown.

Laois Archaeology says chert bands occur in limestone outcrops in Laois and this type of sedimentary rock was used by stone age people to fashion tools and weapons.

Although inferior to flint, it was still widely used in Ireland during the Neolithic Period mainly due to the lack of naturally occurring flint on the island.

Laois Archaeology say the artefact represents over 6,000 years of settlement in the midland county.