Commuters to Dublin from surrounding counties among the highest earners official figures reveal

Conor Ganly

Reporter:

Conor Ganly

commuting

Commuters earn more than those who work closer to home.

Commuters who travel for longer to work have higher wages and workers who travelled greater than 30 minutes to Dublin had highest incomes according to newly compiled official figures.

Central Statistics Office figures from Census 2016 show that the median earned income was €32,004 for commuters travelling 'less than 30 minutes' compared to €41,495 for commuters travelling 'Greater than 30 minutes' in 2016. 

The CSO's Geographical Profiles of Income in Ireland 2016 says the median earned income for all commuters in Ireland in 2016 was €34,579.

Commuters who travel more than 30 minutes to Dublin had a median earned an income of €43,727, compared to commuters travelling 'Greater than 30 minutes' to other cities (€38,592) and to the rest of Ireland (€39,913).

The difference in earnings between travelling 'Less than 30 minutes' (€29,503) and 'Greater than 30 minutes' (€39,913) was highest for commuters travelling to the rest of Ireland, which was over €9,000.

The difference in median earnings by travel time of commuters who travelled from Wicklow was €14,805 in 2016, the highest in the country, followed by Louth (€13,407) and Westmeath (€13,261) in 2016. Laois Commuters were €10,206 better off.

Cork City commuters saw no difference in median earnings based on travel time, while there was a difference of €1,532 for commuters from Dublin City and €3,223 for commuters from South Dublin. 

Median earned income and the difference between median earned incomes by travel time tended to be higher with age in 2016.

The difference between earnings for commuters aged between '40-49' travelling 'Less than 30 minutes' (€35,471) and 'Greater than 30 minutes' (€49,265) was over €13,000, compared to less than €500 for commuters aged '<20'.

Commuters who worked in the Industry sectors and travelled greater than 30 minutes had highest income at €49,428.

The difference between earnings for commuters travelling 'less than 30 minutes' (€36,661) and 'greater than 30 minutes' (€49,428) was highest for Industry also, at nearly €13,000, compared with the difference in earnings for commuters within the Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing sectors, which was around €5,000.

Commuters on motorcycles or scooters had the highest median value for earned income in 2016 of €47,689. The next highest median values were for commuters on bikes (€44,812) and train, Dart or Luas passengers (€44,676).

The lowest median values for earned income were €29,200 for commuters who were car passengers and €31,898 for those travelling by bus, minibus or coach.

Earned income includes gross income from employment and self-employment only and was not adjusted for hours worked.

Read also: MORE M7 DISRUPTION