Six consecutive weeks of deaths from Covid-19 in Laois through lockdown confirmed in official figures

Conor Ganly

Reporter:

Conor Ganly

Email:

news@leinsterexpress.ie

coronavirus covid-19

Covid-19 test centre in Laois

Covid-19 claimed the lives of people in Laois every week from the middle of October to the middle of November according to the latest official figures which reveal the impact of the second wave in Ireland.

The finding is contained in the Central Statistics Office latest report on Covide Deaths and Cases From 28 February to 13 November 2020.

It shows that Covid-19 was a factor in deaths each week before and after Level 5 lockdown between October 9 and November 13. The precise number of weekly deaths and over the six week period is not published. The CSO does not publish figures if there have been less than five deaths but if there have been no deaths it records zero for a given week.

The CSO does not publish the location of the death.

In early October the Kilminchy Nursing Home was hit by an outbreak which led to deaths in the home and the Midland Regional Hospital in Portlaoise. The home has never confirmed the total number of deaths which resulted from the outbreak.

The figures show that 28 people have died after contracting the virus in Laois since February - this amounts to 2% of the national death toll which passed 2,000 in recent days. The median age of those who lost their lives. Up to November 13, 940 people in Laois had tested positive. The median age was 40. 

During the same six week period, there were 426 new cases of the virus in Laois. The worst week for new infections was in the week ending October 16 when 108 new infections were confirmed. Most of the cases were not connected to a confirmed virus which meant the virus was spreading in the community.

The weekly number of new cases has dropped dramatically in Laois to just 24 in the final week of the reporting period which ended on November 13.

Key national findings form the CSO report:

- While the case numbers have fluctuated since August to October from a low of 623 in week ending 07 August to a high of 7,025 in week ending 16 October, the hospital rates, ICU rates and mortality rates have remained stable over the same period.
- The average mortality rate in August, September and October was 5 people per 1,000 confirmed cases, down from a peak of 74 per 1,000 in April
- The average hospitalisation rate in August, September and October was less than 50 people per 1,000 confirmed cases, down from a peak of 192 per 1,000 in March
- The average ICU rate in August, September and October was 5 or less per 1,000 confirmed cases, down from a peak of 27 per 1,000 in March
- The number of cases for the week ending 13 November is 2,363, a decrease of 517 from the previous week
- The median age of new confirmed COVID-19 cases was 36 years old for the week ending 13 November
- More than 20 people have died from COVID-19 in each of the last five weeks
- The median age of COVID-19 Deaths has remained relatively stable at approximately 83 years throughout the duration of the pandemic
- It is the second week in a row that Dublin had less than 1,000 weekly cases. In the week ending 13 November, Dublin accounted for 28% of all new cases
- Just over half (52%) of all confirmed cases are linked to an outbreak and 42% of cases linked to an outbreak are under 25 years old
- Outbreaks in private houses account for 53% of cases linked to an outbreak in the last four weeks, nursing homes account for 10% while childcare facilities and schools together account for 8% of cases
- The average number of contacts per positive case per week was three in the week ending 13 November.

The CSO says the aim of the sixteenth publication in the series of information bulletins is to provide insights into those who have either died from or contracted COVID-19, by using data from the Computerised Infectious Disease Reporting (CIDR) provided to the CSO by the Health Protection Surveillance Centre and data from the HSE’s Swiftcare (A2i) and Covid Care Tracker (CCT) systems.