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04 Oct 2022

WATCH: Shocking scenes of dumping on Laois bog as level triples

Dumping levels in Laois are soaring while Ireland awaits a new law allowing CCTV cameras in court cases.

The weight of rubbish collected up from bogs, woods and roadsides is almost triple what it was three years ago.

Laois County Council has so far collected 642 tonnes of waste thrown away illegally, up to July 2022. That compares to 530 tonnes collected up in the whole of last year, 238 tonnes in 2020, and 367 tonnes in 2019. 

A new video by Laois award winning wildlife photographer Paul Lalor shows the level of dumping near his town of Mountmellick. He posted the video on his page called Forest Bog Mountmellick Flora & Fauna. 

"All kinds of stuff in here. This is a small area where I park. In just six months it is full, household, wheelie bin, nappies, garden waste, builders rubble and even pillows."

Paul who branded the dumping as "shameful", told the Leinster Express about it.

"This little area is in Lower Forest Bog. It was cleared by Coillte for their trucks to turn but now you can't even park a car in the clearing because it has been filled up by rubbish.

"It's a mix of builders rubble, discarded garden waste such as leylandii trees that will never rot, then dumped waste like paint tins and brushes, nappies, even pillows.

"There needs to be a joined up effort by different organisations or this will never stop," Paul said.

Laois County Council has received 576 complaints from the public about environmental crime, so far in 2022.

Most of those, 374 are about waste managment or enforcement. Another 93 were about litter, with the rest about abandoned vehicles, veterinary issues, water quality, air, noise and bring banks.

So far in 2022 they have issued 33 litter fines, and another two fines for dog fouling. 

County councils have had their hands tied in using footage in legal cases since 2020, after the Data Commissioner stated that it required a new law.

The new law is expected to come into force before the end of 2022, as part of the recently agreed Circular Economy Act. 

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